Question: Can Nasal Spray Cause Loss Of Taste?

A: The official prescribing information for Nasacort AQ mentions “alterations of taste and smell.” We have heard from many readers who also have experienced loss of smell or changes in the sense of taste after using a nasal steroid spray like triamcinolone or fluticasone.

What medications can cause loss of taste?

Other commonly used medications that can cause taste and flavor difficulties are allopurinol, captopril, enalapril, nitroglycerin, diltiazem, dipyridamole, nifedipine, hydrochlorothiazide, lisinopril, lithium, lovastatin, and levodopa.

Can you lose your sense of taste from a sinus infection?

Your sense of smell or taste is “off”

Again, the same inflammation that interferes with your sinuses’ natural ability to drain can mess with your sense of smell and taste. So a sinus infection can dull your sense of taste, even though you’ll still be able to tell if something is salty or sweet, according to Dr. Papa.

Does Flonase affect your taste?

No doctor ever suggested my loss of smell was from using Flonase. Nevertheless, many other readers have reported problems with the senses of smell and taste associated with using such a steroid nasal spray. Here is one report: “I had very few problems with allergies until moving to Florida.

Can nasal spray damage your sense of smell?

FDA: Nasal Spray Can Cause Loss Of Smell. The over-the-counter products contain zinc, an ingredient scientists say may damage nerves in the nose needed for smell. The other products affected by the Food and Drug Administration’s announcement are adult and kid-size Zicam Cold Remedy Nasal Swabs.

What is loss of taste a symptom of?

The decreased ability to taste certain types of foods is known medically as hypogeusia; the absence of taste entirely is termed ageusia. Dysgeusia refers to the presence of a metallic, rancid, or foul taste in the mouth. Taking certain medications can also interfere with the ability to taste.

Why would I lose my sense of taste?

The sense of taste is not as well developed as the sense of smell. Aside from normal aging, the most common causes of a loss of the sense of taste are: Nasal airway problems, especially nasal congestion caused by allergies or the common cold. Upper airway infection, such as sinus infection, tonsillitis, or sore throat.

Can loss of taste and smell be restored?

Some loss of taste and smell is natural with aging, especially after age 60. However, other factors can contribute to loss of taste and smell, including: Nasal and sinus problems, such as allergies, sinusitis or nasal polyps.

Can’t taste or smell 2 weeks?

Anosmia is the partial or complete loss of the sense of smell. This loss may be temporary or permanent. Common conditions that irritate the nose’s lining, such as allergies or a cold, can lead to temporary anosmia.

What is the fastest way to get rid of a sinus infection?

  • Drink plenty of water. To help flush the virus out of your system, make sure you’re adequately hydrated.
  • Eat immune-boosting foods.
  • Add moisture.
  • Clear the sinuses with oils.
  • Use a neti pot.
  • Ease facial pain with warm compresses.
  • Use over-the-counter (OTC) medications.
  • Get a prescription.